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Poster [clear filter]
Wednesday, April 25
 

12:50

A comparison of self-paced and instructor-paced online courses: The interactive effects of course delivery mode and student characteristics
Modes of online course delivery are developing and changing rapidly. Lately, an increasing number of online courses are being offered in a self-paced (or a self-paced-approaching) format, which usually means that the course is offered for a longer time and that there is only one due date at the end of the course. This mode of delivery can seem attractive from different perspectives, such as student, teacher, or business perspective. However, despite the growing presence of self-paced courses, little research has been conducted so far into the effectiveness of this delivery mode on student experience and learning. This study explores the effects of the self-paced delivery mode, and its possible interactions with student characteristics on performance. Preliminary findings indicate that success factors of students are similar in self-paced and instructor-paced courses, and that the self-paced format has little effect on students performance. Further research is needed to provide additional insight into advantages and disadvantages of different delivery modes.

Speakers
ST

Sara Topolovec

Delft University of Technology


Wednesday April 25, 2018 12:50 - 13:50
Auditorium

12:50

Developing and revising OER by students – Lessons learned through an open educational practice over 3 years
Open Educational Resources (OER) are being developed and utilized in higher education institutions and various organizations on the globe. In this presentation, the open education practice in a freshmen class in a university in Japan will be introduced. The students in the class were encouraged to develop their own text-based OER based on their interests of the topics concerning information literacy in modern society (cyber security, copyright issues and social networks, and so on). At the same time, they learned the basics of information society and instructional design which is needed to create OER by flipped-classroom settings. The groups for the sharing and reviewing materials were set and the students conducted peer-review to improve their OER each other. From 25 to 30 students registered the class on each year through 2014 to 2016 including the distance learners from the other university connected by the videoconferencing system. By the comments of the students, it is revealed that they surprised the quality of OER created by the other and senior students, and learned the knowledges of the topics, the methodology how to create OER. Another student commented that she learned well to create OER to teach the topics that she is interested. The assessment of these OER revealed that the quality of OER improved every year. As the opportunity how to learn the topics deeply and actively, this open pedagogy based approach through the creation of OER is considered to be an important experience for students and to be an effective method to increase student outcomes utilizes existing OER as meaningful learning resources.

Speakers
avatar for Katsusuke Shigeta

Katsusuke Shigeta

Associate Professor, Hokkaido University, Japan
Associate Director at Center for Open Education, Hokkaido University. Open Education and Educational Technology


Wednesday April 25, 2018 12:50 - 13:50
Auditorium

12:50

Epistemic maturity in social MOOCs: a critical condition for “success” in student-led initiatives
This poster uses a corpus two of the social MOOCs (or sMOOCs) from the European Funded Project ECO. It is composed of the sMOOC “Step by Step” (to learn how to make sMOOCs), and the student-led sMOOC “Doctorat et Poursuite de Carrière”. It tests the hypothesis that, by creating conditions, resources and tools for transfer, students as participants are led to experience transformation in terms of “presence” and “epistemic maturity”.
The results show that transfer is dependent on the negotiation between all stakeholders of a number of tools for support and management. This process affected the various editions of the “Step by Step”, by increasing the availability of “back-office” solutions. The distributed nature of the process also implied constant and consistent coordination of teams, in relation to an agile pedagogical design.
From the perspective of student-led initiatives, the transfer is obvious with direct replication and re-use of resources. Transfer reaches a further step of transformation with remix and repurposing strategies. The process helped build the trust in the community and self-respect among the participants. This trust and confidence in turn translated into competences in management, especially in identifying and using correctly and adequately the distributed competences of the group. Previous experience in the “Step by Step” fostered competences of community management and of facilitation. These results confirm the existence of epistemic maturity as a key achievement of sMOOCs. They call for more research on this topic especially as it redefines the criteria for evaluating the “success” of any sMOOC.

Speakers
avatar for Adeline Bossu

Adeline Bossu

PhD, PhDOOC
DF

Divina Frau-Meigs

CREW University Sorbonne Nouvelle USPC


Wednesday April 25, 2018 12:50 - 13:50
Auditorium

12:50

Improving Learners’ Experience by Adopting Course Maps
In 2008, fourteen top universities in Taiwan established Taiwan Open Courseware Consortium (renamed as Open Course Consortium, abbreviated TOCC, in 2014) to create a common platform for sharing and promoting open courseware. TOCC is intended to encourage and foster its member universities to create more open resources for learning through the online platforms via TOCC as the portal. During the past few years, under the promotion by its member universities, millions of open courseware have been created in either OCW or MOOCs format. Learners can now study anywhere anytime as the courseware has also greatly lowered the barrier of study. However, massive volumes of courseware also confuse learners in a way they have to spend more time surfing around the courseware they already learned and may not still fully understand what will be given in the course even syllabus and introduction are given for each course. To provide a more friendly guidance for learners to quickly manage and locate the exact courseware of interest, TOCC encourages the twenty-two university members and two high school members to make a course map for each produced open courseware. Currently, we have several course maps designed for high school students and college freshmen in Taiwan. With such guided maps, learners can now select among smaller units, combine them and create their own courses. More detail results will be given in the final poster.

Speakers
YH

Yu-Lun Huang

National Chiao Tung University
avatar for Ta-Wei Li

Ta-Wei Li

Chairman, Taiwan Open Course and Education Consortium


Wednesday April 25, 2018 12:50 - 13:50
Auditorium

12:50

Open Education in the Global South findings from the ROER4D Project
Over the course of three years, the Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project – with its 100 researchers across 21 countries in 17 sub-projects – has sought to obtain the data and engage in the analysis necessary to answer this. The main research question for this project is: Can OEP and OER provide equitable access to relevant, high quality, affordable and sustainable education in the Global South?
Using a meta-synthesis approach, the open practices reported in the studies were compared to an idealised or maximal set of open processes outlined in Hodgkinson-Williams’ Open Education cycle, drawing upon Archer’s (2003) social realist theory to uncover agential decision-making about OER creation, use and adaptation in relation to structural and cultural environments.
Findings from the ROER4D project show that, in the Global South contexts that were studied, the ideal or maximal Open Education cycle is incomplete in terms of the benefits of OER adoption being optimised. There are five key points of disjuncture: (1) the dependence on copying of existing OER and the corollary failure to localise; (2) the adaptation of OER, but with inconsistent curation and re-hosting of derivative works on a publicly available platform or repository, which limits access to the derivative OER; (3) limited circulation of derivative OER due, in part, to the absence of a specific communication strategy; (4) inconsistent quality assurance processes; and (5) a weak feedback loop for continuous improvement of the original or derivative work

Reference
Archer, M. (2003). Structure, agency, and the internal conversation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Speakers
GC

Glenda Cox

Lecturer, University of Cape Town
Why academics choose to share or not share their teaching materials as OER. The quality in OER debate. OER and the Library. OER and Open access.
avatar for Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Associate Professor, University of Cape Town
Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams is an Associate Professor in the Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.  She teaches Online Learning Design and Advanced Research Design courses to postgraduate students and also supervises Masters and... Read More →


Wednesday April 25, 2018 12:50 - 13:50
Auditorium

12:50

Open Sketching: Connecting Contexts and Increasing Awareness on openness
In 2016 TU Delft started a university wide Open Science program, aiming to provide an umbrella for open education, open research, open data, open access publications and open source software. In many, perhaps most cases, the people involved for each of these contexts is or could be the same: scientists/teachers at our university. The foundations in which these contexts are based is the same (i.e. a culture of sharing, building upon the efforts and outputs of others).

Still we see that each context is approached separately. Various aspects are only utilized or tackled within its specific context (among others: tools and methods used, opportunities and challenges experienced, lessons learned, output produced and required support). Even though we believe translations of these aspects to other open contexts can be beneficial to people and add to the further development of an open culture in our university, they are somehow not easily transferred to other contexts.

In 2017 we initiated activities to increase awareness on openness and support the development of a more open culture (results of these activities can be viewed at http://opensketching.weblog.tudelft.nl) and http://www.open.tudelft.nl/year-of-open/calendar/)

Based on the results of these context specific activities we took a second step to get to practical suggestions on how to translate the aspects mentioned to other contexts.

At OE Global, within the theme ‘open connections’ we would like to offer an interactive poster session to
demonstrate the results of the activities we organised in 2017, share conclusions based on these activities;
and challenge OE Global participants to build forth on our conclusions.

This way we aim to inspire OE Global participants about approaches to increase awareness of openness independant of the context it is applied to, and contribute to active discussions during the OE Global 2018 conference on the topic of open connections

Speakers
avatar for Mark van Huystee

Mark van Huystee

visualizer/teacher
avatar for Martijn Ouwehand

Martijn Ouwehand

Delft University of Technology


Wednesday April 25, 2018 12:50 - 13:50
Auditorium

12:50

Re-use and Re-design of a TU Delft MOOC on project management for the ECATA consortium
TU Delft is an avid promoter of the use of open educational resources in both online and campus education. In this latest project the faculties of Aerospace Engineering and Civil Engineering are working together to re-use and re-design a MOOC on project management for a consortium of Aerospace professionals. The consortium offers a yearly course to high potential employees from companies like Airbus, SAAB, Safran and Dassault that is designed to enhance the management and leadership capabilities of their future programme directors. The consortium has seen large differences in basic project management skills between their participants over the years and would like to create a pre-course online module to test these skills and to provide all participants with the same basic knowledge pre course. Participants that are already highly skilled can either skip the module or choose an advanced topic to work on.

The goal of the current project is twofold. The first goal is to create a pre-course questionnaire using the topics from the MOOC to identify any gaps in project management skills among participants. This test will be taken by all participants. The second goal is to re-use and re-design as much of the material of the MOOC as possible, in order to create an online module that will help all participants get to the desired starting level in project management before the course begins.

Speakers
MB

Marian Bosch-Rekveldt

Delft University of Technology
JP

Jan Post

Delft University of Technology
MV

Mark Voskuijl

Delft University of Technology
RV

Renee van de Watering

Delft University of Technology


Wednesday April 25, 2018 12:50 - 13:50
Auditorium

12:50

Understanding Learning in Relation to Self-Regulation Using Clickstream Data from a Massive Open Online Course
Advancement in technology has increased access to education, most notably, through Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Given the low completion rates in MOOCs, it appears that opening access to education is insufficient for learning when learners do not have the necessary skills to successfully learn. The lack of external regulation in MOOCs due to the physical distance between learners and instructors means that learners have to rely a lot more on themselves to regulate their learning in order to successfully complete the course. However, most learners have difficulties with self-regulated learning (SRL). Therefore, it is crucial to examine how SRL can be supported in MOOCs. To our knowledge, the current study is the first to examine the use of videos to prompt SRL in MOOCs. When learners interact with any of the course items, the studied MOOC provider logs these interactions as clickstream data. By analyzing the clickstream data, we aim to understand how learners learn and self-regulate their learning when provided with videos to prompt SRL. Data presented in the current paper form part of a larger study in which data are being collected from multiple MOOCs. Results from the MOOC where data have been collected show that learners who viewed the SRL-prompt videos completed more course activities compared to learners who did not view the SRL-prompt videos. In addition, the analysis of sequential pattern of transition shows that learners who viewed the SRL-prompt videos made more progress in the MOOC and the SRL-prompt video is featured in most of the sequences. However, further analysis and development of the algorithm used to analyze clickstream data in this study is needed to better understand how learners learn and model the SRL process in MOOCs. Nonetheless, this paper adds to the field by using clickstream data to examine SRL in MOOCs.

Speakers
MB

Martine Baars

Erasmus University Rotterdam
avatar for Mohammad Khalil

Mohammad Khalil

PostDoc, Delft University of Technology
LDE/CEL
BB

Björn B. de Koning

Erasmus University Rotterdam
FP

Fred Paas

Erasmus University Rotterdam
JW

Jacqueline Wong

Eramus University Rotterdam


Wednesday April 25, 2018 12:50 - 13:50
Auditorium